Friday, January 7, 2011

Social Media Computing

Millions of people are using social networks and also the research community is working of scientific issues related to social networks. In this blog post I'd like to collect some articles that has been brought to my attention recently and are related to social media computing.

To begin with, the August'10 issue of IEEE Computer was dedicated to social networks containing one article entitled "Social Multimedia Computing" with the aim to bridge social science and multimedia technology:
  • Abstract: The explosive growth of social multimedia content on the Internet is revolutionizing content distribution and social interaction. It has even led to a new research area, called social multimedia computing.
  • Citation: Yonghong Tian, Jaideep Srivastava, Tiejun Huang, Noshir Contractor, "Social Multimedia Computing," Computer, vol. 43, no. 8, pp. 27-36, June 2010, doi:10.1109/MC.2010.188
Recently, I came along the blog post of Mathias Lux "Social Media, Tagging and Images Semantics" which leads to an article of Neela Sawant, Jia Li and James Z. Wang entitled Automatic image semantic interpretation using social action and tagging data that gives a survey over more than 200 papers in this area:
  • Abstract: The plethora of social actions and annotations (tags, comments, ratings) from online media sharing Websites and collaborative games have induced a paradigm shift in the research on image semantic interpretation. Social inputs with their added context represent a strong substitute for expert annotations. Novel algorithms have been designed to fuse visual features with noisy social labels and behavioral signals. In this survey, we review nearly 200 representative papers to identify the current trends, challenges as well as opportunities presented by social inputs for research on image semantics. Our study builds on an interdisciplinary confluence of insights from image processing, data mining, human computer interaction, and sociology to describe the folksonomic features of users, annotations and images. Applications are categorized into four types: concept semantics, person identification, location semantics and event semantics. The survey concludes with a summary of principle research directions for the present and the future.
Finally, the same blog post contains a nice figure (see below) originating from a blog post of Frederic Cavazza on the "Social Media Landscape" already some time ago.
Social Media Landscape

It provides - among others - an "infinity of tools and services" and an advice which I'd like to quote here: "Jump into the water!"

The same advice I'd like to give to you regarding the "Special Technical Community on Social Networking" that is currently being created within the IEEE Computer Society: Jump into the water and join this very exciting and new activity:

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